Metalwork graduates present Bishop's new crosier

Two Sheffield Hallam University metalwork graduates, Stefan Tooke and Nick Palmer, used laser cutting technology to craft a new ceremonial crosier for the Bishop of Sheffield after winning a competition organized by the University.

Sheffield, England - Two Sheffield Hallam University metalwork graduates, Stefan Tooke and Nick Palmer, used laser cutting technology to craft a new ceremonial crosier for the Bishop of Sheffield after winning a competition organized by the University. The competition, which launched last year, marked the centenary of stainless steel.

The old crosier, which is 100 years old this year, is not allowed to leave the cathedral and cannot be used in ceremonies in other parishes. The new crosier, made of stainless steel, silver, gold-plated silver, and wood, unscrews into three parts and can be easily transported.

The Bishop wanted something to use at ceremonies outside of the cathedral and that captures Sheffield's industrial heritage—and the new crosier fits that brief perfectly. The crook at the top of the crosier is made entirely from stainless steel, and is engraved with Psalms 95.1 and 95.7. The flames are fashioned from gold-plated silver and the crucible underneath the head is made from silver. Underneath the crucible is a laser-cut steel tube with blue detail, which symbolizes Sheffield's rivers.

The students used a combination of traditional welding, piercing, and spinning techniques to create the crosier, along with modern approaches such as laser cutting.

Partner organizations involved in making the crosier include Sheffield Hallam University, the Assay Office, and the Laser Cutting Company.

For further information, please visit http://www.shu.ac.uk.

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